Archive for the ‘Recipes’ Category

Shadden’s BBQ Sauce

September 21, 2010

Shadden’s BBQ Sauce

  • ¼ cup oil
  • ½ stick butter
  • 2 small onions (chopped very fine)
  • 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • ½ bottle A-1 Sauce
  • ¾ bottle ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • ½ tablespoons Tabasco
  • ¼ lemon (grated; including rind)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Cayenne pepper to taste (for added heat)

— Sauté onion in butter and oil until tender

— Add other ingredients, mix well and cook for 30-45 minutes.

(SHADDEN’S BARBECUE, MARVELL, AR; from High Cotton Cookin)

Shadden’s BBQ may have closed, but its bullet-hole studded sign lives on in the Southern Food and Beverage Museum.  Click here to read more…

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New Orleans con sabor Latino

September 20, 2010

by Kelsey Parris

Edgar Sierras' Plaintains Foster. Photo by Natalie Root Photography

New Orleans has always been a city that thrived on new people and cultures, absorbing the different traditions and foods and integrating them into the city’s own culture. La Louisiane was never a homogenous community, and its ability to accept different ethnicities and adapt to the land was key to its survival. French, Acadians, Germans, Spanish, Native Americans, and Africans were among those people who had to work together to create livable settlements. Food collaboration was an important part of making ends meet, and settlers learned how to produce and use native foods while introducing their own techniques and flavors, thus creating the cuisine of Louisiana Cajuns and Creole. Over the years, later immigrant populations brought their own cuisines, and some larger groups such as the Sicilians and Vietnamese were able to retain their culinary identity while adapting to the local styles and products.

Historically, New Orleans and Louisiana have been closely tied to Spain, Mexico, and Latin American countries.  Even though Spain ruled the Louisiana territory from 1763 until 1803, Spanish speaking influences never seemed to be able to penetrate the dominant French culture.  There are interesting exceptions to that rule, though, as the Isleños of Saint Bernard Parish show. Groups of Spanish Canary Islanders arrived in 1778 as part of the Spanish government’s plan to protect the city of New Orleans from hostile invasion from the British. It was thought that by settling sympathetic people in vulnerable areas, the threatened invasion of the English from the Eastern territory could be halted.

Although this invasion never quite came to pass, the Isleños settled throughout Louisiana, with a pretty serious concentration in St. Bernard Parish. Since it was a fairly insular community, a dialect of Spanish was spoken, and foods such as paella, empanadillos, flan, and candies, as well as a love of fresh fish and game were passed through the generations. Caldo is one example: a soup that is a traditional Canary Island staple, made with tons of fresh vegetables, beans, pork, and carefully guarded family recipes. The Isleños Museum in Chalmette chronicles the lives of this group, and also holds an annual festival, Los Isleños Fiesta, that celebrates the culture of the community. Spanish and Latin American immigrants must have appreciated the existence of the Spanish cultural community and it gradually expanded and crept into the city of New Orleans.

In 2005, a new threat was realized, and this time the British had nothing to do with it. New Orleans and Louisiana were devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and the area was again dependent on immigrant populations to help rebuild and repopulate the city and strengthen the culture that made it special. Latin Americans from Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries recognized the need for labor and the potential for good and steady income, and settled in New Orleans to man the rebuilding efforts.

Suddenly a great need for authentic Latin American food arose with this new influx of workers and their families. As the population settled in, the stores and restaurants that sprang up, stocking food supplies and brand names that the immigrants were familiar with, are usually owned and operated by native Spanish speakers who want to reach out and create a sense of community. Shelves overflow with peppers and tortillas, tamale wrappers and corn cakes. Thanks to the higher demand for food on the go, the food truck phenomenon has finally arrived in New Orleans through the now ubiquitous taco trucks.

Adolfo Garcia's LA Drum with Crabmeat Catacones and Avocado Remoulade. Photo by natalie Root Photography

In SoFAB’s newest exhibit, New Orleans con sabor Latino, photographer Natalie Root and curator Zella Llerena have gone through the city and the surrounding areas, finding people with Latin American ties, whether it be ancestral, like Isleños Mike and Donna, first generation, like Chef Adolfo Garcia, or recent arrivals to the city. Through their research, they have found through preparing their traditional food while incorporating elements of Louisiana’s foods, a new cuisine is evolving. Some home cooks add okra to their dishes, others use grits. In professional kitchens, chefs have brought flavors of their homes to the menu while weaving them into the bounty of Louisiana produce and seafood.

This is a cultural shift that seems like it will slowly integrate itself into the food and culture of New Orleans and Louisiana, and it is important to recognize the changes that are taking place, and to give credit to those who are helping to make it happen. In the same way that Sicilians and Vietnamese have gradually introduced their foods and communities through stores and restaurants to become part of the fabric of the region’s culture, Latin Americans are poised to settle in.

More reading…

Gambit’s article on Latin American Food stores: http://bestofneworleans.com/gyrobase/Content?oid=oid%3A49431

Slate’s article post-K about influx of Latin American workers: http://www.slate.com/id/2140224/entry/2140240

Rio Mar’s site and mission statement: http://www.riomarseafood.com/about-us/welcome/

John Folse’s Caldo

Prep Time: 2 Hours
Yields: 8 Servings

Ingredients:

1 pound white beans
1 pound diced ham
1 pound pickled meat or smoked sausage
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 cups diced onions
1 cup diced celery
1 cup diced bell peppers
1/4 cup minced garlic

1 (8-ounce) can tomato sauce
1 gallon cold water
1 (15-ounce) can string beans
2 (15-ounce) cans mustard greens
2 (15-ounce) cans spinach
1 (15-ounce) can corn
1 (15-ounce) can peas
1 (15-ounce) can sweet potatoes
1 (15-ounce) can yellow squash
1 (15-ounce) can new potatoes
1 and 1/2 heads shredded cabbage2 ears corn
salt and black pepper to taste
Louisiana hot sauce to taste

Method:

In a 12-quart Dutch oven, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add ham and pickled meat and sauté until golden brown. Stir in onions, celery, bell peppers and minced garlic. Saute 3–5 minutes or until vegetables are wilted. Add white beans, tomato sauce and water. Bring mixture to a rolling boil and continue to cook 1 hour or until beans are tender. Blend in all canned vegetables along with cabbage and fresh corn. Continue to cook over medium heat approximately 30 minutes. Season to taste with salt, pepper and hot sauce. Additional water may be added to retain consistency during cooking. Serve as a soup over steamed white rice.

Recipe from WFAB.com

Recipe: Watermelon Rum Punch

September 20, 2010

Stephanie Jane Carter

The blue, dented pick-up truck that parks in the shade of the oak trees on Carollton Avenue is the kind of vehicle that makes me smile.  With a hand-painted sign announcing its wares, watermelons filled the bed of the truck this week.  While the weather has started to give us a break, it is still hot in New Orleans and watermelons are still the answer for a couple more weeks.  Here is a cocktail to celebrate the end of summer.

photo by Stephanie Jane Carter

Watermelon Rum Punch

Makes one cocktail

1 cup red seedless watermelon, cubed

2 ounces white rum

1 tablespoon agave nectar

juice of 1 and a half limes (about 3 tablespoons)

1 tablespoon chopped mint

crushed ice

Chile Lime Salt (optional)

Combine the cubed watermelon, rum, agave nectar, and lime juice in a blender (or in a bowl if using an emmersion blender).  Puree until the mixture is smooth.  Strain through a fine mesh strainer.  Set aside.  If desired, coat the lip of a glass with the chile lime salt by rubbing the lip with a damp towel and dipping the lip into the salt.  Fill the glass with ice.  Add watermelon mixture and chopped mint.  Stir well.

Recipe: Avocado Vichyssoise

August 6, 2010
Avocado Vichyssoise

Avocado Vichyssoise

by Stephanie Jane Carter

“But in summer, when the soup seemed to be too hot, we asked for milk for which to cool it.  Many years later, it was this inspiration to make the soup which I have named Creme Vichyssoise.” (Louis Diat 1885-1957)

When the French-born chef, Louis Diat, was the chef at the Ritz Carlton in New York, he remembered a pureed potato soup served to him by his mother in his hometown, a village near Vichy in France.  Served hot, he often asked for milk to cool the soup.  From this concept, Diat created one of our most well-known soups, cold and refreshing Vichyssoise.

In this version, we have added another item that says summer to us, the avocado.  We find the flavor refreshing and surprising and we hope you do too.

Avocado Vichyssoise

Serves 6

2 leeks, trimmed, washed, and thinly sliced*

1/8 cup unsalted butter

2 russet potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters

6 cups water

1 bouquet garni (2-3 sprigs parsley, 1 sprig thyme, 1 bay leaf)

Salt, to taste

3 medium avocados, peeled and pitted

1/4 cup fresh lime juice

1/2 cup Creme Fraiche

1/4 cup chopped chives

1.  Sweat the leeks in the butter and a pinch of salt.  Allow them to soften without developing color.

2.  Add the potatoes and the water and another sprinkling of salt.

3.  Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer.

4.  Simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are soft.

5.  Remove the bouquet garni and puree the soup.

6.  Let soup chill thoroughly.

7.  Add the avocados to the soup and puree until smooth.

8.  Just before serving, add the lime juice and stir to incorporate.

9.  Ladle into bowls and garnish with a dollop of creme fraiche and a sprinkling of chives.

*Normally, with a vichyssoise, one would only use the white parts of the leeks so that the soup could remain white.  However, this is not necessary in this version since the end product is green due to the addition of the avocados.

Recipe: Coca-Cola–Glazed Baby Back Ribs

July 6, 2010

By Virginia Willis

Makes about
20 pieces

Coca-Cola is to Atlanta as Guinness is to Dublin. Friends and family liked my Coca-Cola–Glazed Wings (page 24) so much that I decided to try a similar combination on pork. Pork has a natural affinity for sweet, rich caramel flavors. These “nouveau” Southern ribs are by no means traditional, but they are lip-smacking good.

Scotch bonnet peppers are intensely hot, but their fire is tempered by the sweetness of the sugar and Coke. To tone down the heat, substitute jalapeños instead.

1 cup Coca-Cola Classic

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

11/2 cups firmly packed light brown sugar

2 Scotch bonnet chiles, chopped

2 racks baby back ribs (3 pounds total)

Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

To make the glaze, in a small saucepan, bring the Coca-Cola, vinegar, brown sugar, and chiles to a boil over high heat; reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until syrupy, about 10 minutes. Decrease the heat to low and keep the sauce warm while the ribs cook.

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Liberally season both sides of the ribs with salt and pepper. Place the ribs on a broiler pan and bake for 30 minutes, glazing the ribs occasionally with the Coca-Cola mixture. Turn the ribs over and continue to cook for an additional 30 minutes, glazing occasionally, or until the ribs are tender and the meat is starting to pull away from the bone.

When the ribs are cooked through, set the oven to broil. Liberally spoon half of the remaining glaze over the ribs and broil until glazed a deep mahogany brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Turn over; repeat with the remaining glaze, an additional 5 to 7 minutes.

Serve immediately with lots of napkins.

……..

Virginia Willis and Lisa Eckus-Saffer will be at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum on July 20 for a special Cookbook Publishing seminar.  Find out more here.  http://southernfood.org/sofab/explore/events/cookbook-publishing-101/

Reprinted with permission from Bon Appétit, Y’all: Recipes and Stories from Three Generations of Southern Cooking by Virginia Willis, copyright © 2008. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House.
Photo credit: Ellen Silverman © 2008

Hurricanes: Here’s to Drinking Them and Not Enduring Them

June 8, 2010

by Stephanie Jane Carter

With experts predicting an active hurricane season for 2010, it seems an appropriate time to toast to one filled with drinking them, but not enduring them.

The Hurricane Cocktail was popularized by Pat O’Brien, who served it in glasses that were shaped like hurricane lamps.  “Pat O” actually trademarked the glasses in 1941.   Today’s hurricane is most often made with a pink powder mix, but the original one was a delicious concoction of fruit juices, rum, and Galliano.  The difference between the two is like the difference between fresh fruit juice and Kool-Aid.  While there are times that we are in the mood for Kool-Aid, it would be a shame to never have the real thing.

If you are interested in learning more about the Hurricane, stop by the Southern Food and Beverage Museum to see the special exhibit on the cocktail.  For more information, visit the website, http://www.southernfood.org.

HURRICANE COCKTAIL

1 ounce Meyer’s Dark Rum

1 ounce Ronrico Silver, or other light rum

1/2 ounce Galliano

2 ounces freshly squeezed orange juice

2 ounces unsweetened pineapple juice

1 ounce passion fruit nectar

Dash of Angostura Bitters

Tropical fruit for garnish, if desired

Put the light and dark rums, fruit juices, bitters, and Galliano in a cocktail shaker with ice.  Shake.  Strain into a 26 ounce hurricane glass filled with ice.  Garnish with tropical fruit, if desired.

Recipe: American Beach Tomato Gravy

May 11, 2010

image by S.J.Carter

This recipe has been adapted from The American Beach Cookbook by Marsha Dean Phelts, University Press of Florida, 2008.

2 tablespoons rendered bacon fat

1/4 c all-purpose flour

1 pound ripe tomatoes, small-dice, seeds and skins removed

1/2 c milk

salt and black pepper, to taste

Add bacon fat to a cast iron frying pan over medium-low heat.  As the bacon fat slowly becomes warmer, sprinkle in the flour.  Stir constantly.  Cook until flour and bacon fat mixture is brown.  Add some salt and a generous amount of pepper.  Once the mixture is a deep brown, add the diced tomatoes.  Once the mixture becomes slightly thicker, add milk to reach the desired consistency.

Serving Suggestion:  Serve over grits and pan-fried trout, or on a biscuit.

Recipe: La Varenne Gougères

April 1, 2010

by Virginia Willis

La Varenne Gougères

photo by Virginia Willis

La Varenne Gougères

Makes 20 medium puffs

This is a savory version of the classic French pastry dough pâte à choux used to make profiteroles and éclairs. Gougères are a classic Burgundian treat commonly served with apéritifs at parties, bistros, and wine bars. You can increase the recipe (see Variation, following), but do not double it, as it does not multiply well.

A note of encouragement: don’t panic when you are adding the eggs and the dough starts to look awful. Just keep stirring and it will come together.

3/4 cup water

1/3 cup unsalted butter

3/4 teaspoon coarse salt

3/4 cup all-purpose flour

5 large eggs, at room temperature

3/4 cup grated Gruyère cheese (about 21/2 ounces)


Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with a silicone baking sheet or parchment paper.

To make the dough, in a medium saucepan, bring the water, butter, and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt to a boil over high heat. Immediately remove the pan from the heat, add the flour all at once, and beat vigorously with a wooden spoon until the mixture is smooth and pulls away from the sides of the pan to form a ball, 30 to
60 seconds. (This mixture is called the panade.) Beat the mixture over low heat for an additional 30 to 60 seconds to dry the mixture.

To make the egg wash, whisk 1 of the eggs in a small bowl with the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt until well mixed; set aside. With a wooden spoon, beat the remaining 4 eggs into the dough, one at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition. (It will come together, I promise.) Beat until the dough is shiny and slides from the spoon. Add the grated cheese.

If using parchment paper to line the baking sheet, “glue” down the paper at this point with a few dabs of the dough.

To form the gougères, use either a tablespoon for a rustic look, or for a more finished appearance, a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch round tip. Spoon or pipe 12 mounds of dough about 2 inches in diameter onto the baking sheet, spacing them at least 2 inches apart. Brush the puffs with the reserved egg wash.

Bake until puffed and golden, 25 to 30 minutes. To test for doneness, remove one puff from the baking sheet and let it cool for 45 to 60 seconds. If it remains crisp and doesn’t deflate, it is done. If not, return it to the oven and continue baking 5 to 10 minutes more.

…..

Virginia Willis is the author of Bon Appétit, Y’all:  Recipes and Stories
from Three Generations of Southern Cooking.

For more about Virginia, visit www.virginiawillis.com

Reprinted with permission from Bon Appétit, Y’all:  Recipes and Stories
from Three Generations of Southern Cooking by Virginia Willis, copyright ©
2008. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House.

Purchase Bon Appétit, Y’all:  Recipes and Stories
from Three Generations of Southern Cooking.  Visit the SoFAB Store.

Recipe: Liz’s Limoncello

March 17, 2010

2 large lemons
water as needed
2 cups granulated sugar
2 cups vodka

Rinse lemons and pat dry. Thinly peel zest strips from lemons. Do not include whiter inner peel. Place zest strips into medium saucepan. Cut lemons in half and squeeze juice into measuring cup. Remove any seeds. Measure juice and add enough water to bring to the 1 cup mark. Pour lemon juice mixture into saucepan with zest, add sugar and stir. Bring mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. When it reaches a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.
Pour lemon mixture into aging container, add vodka and stir. Cap and age for 4 weeks in a cool, dark place.
After initial aging, pour through metal strainer into bowl to remove zest. Lemon peel may be saved for use in cooking, if desired. Pour liqueur back into cleaned aging container for an additional month of aging.
When aging is completed, strain liqueur through fine cloth (such as muslin) which is placed over a large bowl.  Repeat as needed.  A cloudy layer may form on top even after several strainings.  The cloudy portion may be poured off and reserved for cooking if desired. bottle and cap as desired. Liqueur is now ready to be used in cooking but is better for drinking after an additional 3 month’s aging.

Aging container can be :
Glass jars with lids
Ceramic crock with lid
Ceramic bowls, glass bottles, and/or decanters with eitehr screw-on lids/caps or cork/glass caps

Recipe: Café Brûlot Liqueur

March 17, 2010

Liz Williams recently gave a class on homemade liqueurs at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum.  This is her recipe for Café Brûlot Liqueur.  For more information on events at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum, visit www.southernfood.org.


2 1/2 cups freshly brewed coffee and chicory

2 cups sugar

Orange peel studded with cloves

1 cinnamon stick

Lemon peel

1 fifth brandy

While coffee is still hot, add sugar to dissolve. Add all ingredients except brandy.  When cool, add brandy.  Pour into aging container.  Cover.  Age for 3 weeks.  Strain.  Age for 3 more months.